Friday, September 17, 2010

Basque Foods

Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Basque Food
Cuisine and the kitchen are at the heart of Basque culture, and there is a Museum of Gastronomy in Llodio. Basques embraced the potato and the capsicum, used in hams, sausages and recipes, with pepper festivals around the area, notably Ezpeleta and Puente la Reina. Jews expelled from Spain and Portugal created a chocolate and confectionery industry in Bayonne still well-known today, and part of a wider confectionery and pastry tradition across the Basque Country. Basques have also been quick to absorb new ingredients and techniques from new settlers and from their own trade and exploration links.

The French and Spanish influence is strong also, with a noted difference between the cuisine of either side of the modern border; even iconic Basque dishes and products, such as txakoli from the South, or G√Ęteau Basque (Biskotx) and Jambon de Bayonne from the North, are rarely seen on the other side. The mountainous nature of the Basque Country has led to a difference between coastal cuisine dominated by fish and seafood, and inland cuisine with fresh and cured meats, many vegetables and legumes, and freshwater fish and salt cod. Basque cuisine is influenced by the abundance of produce from the sea on one side and the fertile Ebro valley on the other.

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